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Best Custom Suits NYC

You have come to the right place- We are masters of custom suits- Our Bespoke tailors crafts suits and shirts by hand. No tailor is more experienced in the art of fine tailored custom clothing. Here are some pointers for fall Suit purchases below!

Man in grey suit and black peacoat

When the icy chill of winter rears its frosty head, it’s time to push your linen and seersucker suits to the back of the closet and opt for something bit warmer. Suit fabrics make all the difference when you’re forced to bear the cold while managing to look sharp.

However, winter suiting does not have to be boring. In the same way that the warm summer weather gave you a surfeit of outfit flexibility in the form of summer suits (opens in new window), you can apply the same creativity and style to your cold-weather ensembles.

Look cool and stay warm all winter long. Here is our definitive guide on what to look for in a winter suit.

What to Look for in a Winter Suit

If anyone tries to sell you a suit claiming that it’s suitable for year-round wear, grab your money and run. A fabric that is breathable and lightweight in the summer will make you miserable in the winter, and vice versa.

man wearing a winter suit
TM Lewin
Unless you live in a very temperate climate, you should have a designated selection of suits for, at the very least, summer and winter. For the best winter suit, pay attention to the suit’s construction and fabric. These factors will determine the suit’s ability to keep you warm.

Depending on how cold it gets where you live, be sure to stick to half- or fully-lined suit jackets. Lined jackets will resist wrinkles, retain warmth, and hold up better during travel and everyday wear than unlined suits. Here are some of the best fabrics, colors, and patterns for winter suiting.

WINTER SUIT FABRICS

The optimal winter suit will be made of a warmer, thicker fabric that will keep you nice and toasty against the elements. Stay away from the lighter suit fabrics like cotton, polyester, linen, seersucker, chambray, and fresco, as these will induce endless shivering. Unlike summer suits, winter fabric better lends itself to retaining a suit’s shape and maintain their structure exceptionally well, so you won’t have to worry as much about wrinkling or wearing of material.

The Wool Suit

To this day, wool remains the most popular suit fabric. Wool is a fabric renowned for its ability to drape nicely, maintain its form, and its versatility in being able to be spun as loose and breathable or tight and warm as necessary. Wool suits have maintained the position of being the most popular suit on the market for decades, because of these versatile qualities.

man wearing wool suit
Trashness / GQ
This is a great place to start acquiring your winter suiting, as a good wool suit is easy to find and comes in a variety of types. Worsted wool is the most popular wool used for suits, as it is highly adaptable to temperature change, wears well, and gives off that slight shine that you find in most suits on the market. Other popular types of wool are tweed and flannel. Worsted is considered mid-weight wool, tweed is heavier, and flannel is the heaviest. Flannel and tweed are discussed in greater detail below.

The Cashmere Suit

Arguably one of the most coveted and luxurious suit fabrics on the market, cashmere is known for its unparalleled soft texture, comfort, and most importantly warmth. However, some of the biggest drawbacks for this fabric is its price tag and its lack of durability.

man wearing cashmere suit
Jacket Designs / Paul Smith
Rather than shelling out thousands for a 100% cashmere suit that won’t last you very long, opt for a wool or polyester blend. Blends keep cashmere prices low while giving you the advantage of other fabrics’ durability. Along with being soft, cashmere is also amazing for keeping you consistently warm. The fabric is highly adaptable to climate change and will be able to insulate you very well.

However, be very particular about how you store your suit because cashmere attracts moths, who can chew $1,000 holes into your suits quicker than you will be able to wear them. If you do decide on a cashmere or cashmere blend suit, protect your purchase with a cedar closet or mothballs.

The Tweed Suit

Tweed is a great winter suit fabric that will always give timeless ease to the wearer. The fabric is made from wool and created by combining three differently colored yarns, which are then twilled.

man wearing tweed suit
Jennis & Warmann / Hawes & Curtis
To “twill” is to weave yarn in such a way that it produces a distinctive pattern unique only to this variety of fabric. Tweed makes a fine winter suit choice because it is thick, warm, water resistant, and durable. However, tweed suits are a little heavier compared with most suits, and the fabric is coarse to the touch. If you live in a very cold winter climate and you don’t mind the feel of the fabric, a tweed suit is definitely the way to go to make a classic statement.

The Flannel Suit

Another winter suit fabric is flannel, which was made for protecting against cold climates. Traditionally speaking, flannel suits are for more mature gentlemen. But flannel is increasingly reinventing itself as a suit fabric for the bold and stylish modern man.

man wearing flannel suit
Though these suits are weather appropriate, they aren’t always comfortable in an office environment because of their weight. Flannel is typically made of worsted wool. It is similar to tweed and herringbone in terms of look, but it’s softer to the touch. These suits have the advantage of being hip and stylish, giving wearers a polished and slightly felted appearance. Flannel also appears the most luxurious of the heavier fabrics because it is extremely soft. However, flannel suits are a bit tougher to find, and you can expect to pay a pretty penny ($800-$2000) to get your hands on one.

If you can afford a flannel suit, having one in your winter arsenal will show the world that you are able to curate your look appropriately with the changing seasons and that you are a style trendsetter. Flannel is acceptable for day-to-day use, but may not be formal enough for special occasions or strict dress codes.

The Herringbone Suit

Much like tweed, the herringbone is heavy, warm, and durable. What distinguishes herringbone from tweed is a distinctive thin zig-zag pattern.

man wearing herringbone suit
Like tweed, herringbone suits are made from twilled yarn, typically from materials like wool or flannel. Both tweed and herringbone fabrics consist of a tighter weave than most suits, making for a more structured and durable garment. The thickness of the fabric paired with the subtle zig-zag design cause this suit to give off an illusion of depth, making this suit ideal for gentlemen on the slimmer side.

WINTER SUIT COLORS

It’s great to have some all-season suit staples in black, navy, or charcoal. However, just because the winter is prime time for darker hues, this does not mean you can’t also have a little fun with color. If you already have your suit staples in check, try implementing some of these daring options into your winter wardrobe. Feel free to go bold with a full suit in one of these colors, or break it up with a colored jacket, pants, or accessories.

Oxblood

men wearing oxblood suits
Definitely not your average black, gray, or navy suit, oxblood suits are popping up everywhere these days. What exactly is oxblood? Oxblood is a deep shade of burgundy, a shade that commands presence and attention when you walk into a room while maintaining a suit’s formal essence. It is bold enough to make a statement but not so loud that it isn’t office appropriate.

Hunter Green

men wearing hunter green suits
Another great color that makes a statement without coming off forced is hunter green. This particular shade of dark green looks great and is a classy alternative to the traditional neutral tones. Slightly jewel-toned in hue, but still deep and reserved, you’d be hard-pressed NOT to include this color in your arsenal this winter.

Cognac

Men wearing cognac suits
Though brown is also on trend for the fall and winter months, how about trying its caramel-y, amber cousin instead? A neutral color that is more modern than the traditional brown and more stylish than, let’s say, khaki, a cognac suit will impress your coworkers without attracting any wayward looks from the boss. Cognac is a perfect suit color for those looking to add a unique element to their ensemble without being overstated.

Plum

men wearing plum suits
Deep, deep purple on a suit will be sure to give you an edge to stand out. Like oxblood, plum is a bold color choice, so wear it with pride, and you’ll be sure to look like a true connoisseur of style.

ACCESSORIZING YOUR WINTER SUIT

Just because it’s winter does not mean you can’t have fun with your style. Your winter suit colors tend to be darker. Choose accessories that either complement (dark hues) or contrast (bright, patterned) your suit for a big impact. Feel free to play up textures and patterns to add dimension to your look.

Custom Suits & Shirts NYC, Best of the Best

Best Custom Suits in NYC

Sew Bespoke tailors the finest custom suits in the industry of tailored suits. No other Bespoke tailor surpassed our handmade quality. NYC is the home of the custom suit and we are here to provide it.

A bespoke suit has the power all on its own to imbue a sense of confidence and prominence in any man who wears it. When you don a bespoke suit, you will instantly feel like a king amongst men. But no one ever said becoming king would be easy. It takes meticulous care, precision in language, and sartorial knowledge to bring your first bespoke suit to fruition.

What is a Bespoke Suit?

To “bespeak” means to give an order. In terms of fashion, the definition of a “bespoke suit” is a suit that the tailor crafts out of someone’s vision. It is an original, one-of-a-kind garment made to the wearer’s preference, to a T. That particular suit is made for and owned by exactly one man, and the suit was hand-drawn and crafted based on exact specifications from the wearer’s body.

bespoke suit
JH Cutler
Degrees of Suit Tailoring:

Ready-to-wear suit: A mass-produced suit, made in a factory, that you can find in department stores. You can wear the suit almost immediately after purchase, save for some minor tailoring adjustments.

Made-to-measure Suit: A standard suit pattern is made to fit your measurements. Though not factory-made, this suit comes from a pre-existing design.

A unique, perfectly tailored suit is not an immediate thing. You will have to work with your tailor for it, which entails much more than going to the nearest clothier that comes up on Yelp. Your first tailor visit is akin to a rite of passage, much like your first date or your first car, so you’ll want to do it right. You’ll have to know about suiting construction and tailoring terminology to convey exactly what you want.

Bespoke suit: The entire suit is created without a pre-existing pattern or design.

What Kind of Suit Do You Need?

All things brought onto this earth deserve a purpose. Save your suit from a painful existence of confusion. First, ask yourself: where is this suit meant to be worn? A wedding? A funeral? A court appearance? A new job? Everywhere, simply to impress the public? Tell your suit tailor.

Suit vs. Tux

A tuxedo is considered more formal, or flashy, than a suit. The main difference is that a tux has satin lapels, and they are often worn with bowties.

bespoke suit vs tux
You can order a bespoke tuxedo, but tuxes run at higher prices, and there are fewer occasions to wear them. A bespoke suit costs thousands of dollars, and a bespoke tuxedo would cost about 30-40% more. Other than weddings, galas, operas, award shows, etc. you can’t wear a tuxedo to a business meeting or just walking down a fashionable street. You can, however, wear a suit to any of those formal events.

Study Up on Fabric

There are a lot of veritable suit fabrics out there waiting to be discovered. As overwhelming as that may sound, there are a few key fabrics you’ll want to stick to, especially for your first bespoke suit (which makes things a little easier). Your suit should be good for three seasons and be composed of a fabric lightweight enough that you won’t overheat but sturdy enough that you’ll also be comfortable if it’s a little chilly.

Here are the best fabrics to look for in tailored suits:

Worsted Wool

Most popular wool used for suits
Highly adaptable to temperature change
Slight sheen
Extremely versatile
Great for solid-colored suits
SUPER 120s Wool

Very fine wool, 17.75 Microns in diameter
Luxurious and lightweight
Ideal for three-season suits
Mohair

Angora goat hair
Silky luster, more texturized
Insulating
Naturally wrinkle-resistant
Flannel

A soft, brushed worsted wool
Resembles tweed and herringbone
Wide selection of colors and weights
Breathable, perfect for spring and fall
Two-Piece Suit Or Three-Piece Suit?

Do you want a matching vest with your suit jacket and trousers? Traditionally, two-piece suits are less formal. Three-piece suits are appropriate for high brow gatherings like weddings and dinner parties, and they will keep you warmer. Most importantly, they can be worn as a two-piece suit when you remove the vest. On the other hand, a two-piece suit can’t become a three-piece unless you have that third matching piece.

bespoke suit two piece vs three piece

If you don’t need all that formality, or you live in a warmer climate, a standard two-piece suit might be a better option. Plus, two-piece suits are cheaper. But we recommend getting a three-piece suit simply because it’s more versatile and can be worn with or without the vest. Again, it’s all up to you.

Learn the Lingo: Tailor Terminology

When it comes to making a suit from scratch, there are a lot of nuanced details to consider. Now, the language of a tailor is vast, but here are a few basic terms and components you should study up on.

Suit Jacket Lapel

The part on each side of your suit jacket immediately below the collar that is folded back on either side.

bespoke suit lapel style

Lapel Styles

Notched Lapels: the standard lapel

Peaked Lapels: have “peaks” that point upward

Shawl Lapels: a continuous piece without notches or peaks

Pants Cuff

The cuff is optional. It’s the bit of fabric on your suit pants that is folded up and pressed. Though cuffless pants are more popular, we love and recommend a 1.5-inch cuff.

bespoke suit pants cuff

Suit Jacket Vent

These slits at the back of your jacket allow for a tailored fit and easy mobility. Center vents are traditional, whereas two side vents are a bit more modern, and they make the jacket look more fitted.

bespoke suit jacket vents

Pant Break

This term refers to how much if the pant leg meets the shoes.

bespoke suit pants break

Medium/Half Pant Break: the industry-standard that results in just a little foldover. If you want to err on the safe side, ask for a medium break

Full Pant Break: offers at least one full fold or “break” over your shoes.

Quarter Pant Break: just grazes over the tops of your shoes

No Break: just meets the tops of your shoes. This is for the sartorially daring.

(For more, read our guide on trouser length (opens in new window).)

Spalla Camicia

Padding or spalla camicia? Do you want padded shoulders or shoulders without padding (spalla camicia) on your custom suit? The former will create a broad appearance, while the latter will create a soft and natural transition from shoulder to arm. The latter is also more fashion-forward.

Taper

Basically, this means narrowing or gradually coming in (think the opposite of bell bottoms). Having your jacket and trousers tapered slightly to fit your build is both more fashionable and more signature of bespoke custom suits.

Single-Breasted or Double-Breasted

Single-breasted jackets have one column of two to three buttons down the center. Double-breasted jackets have an outer column of functional buttons and an inner column of decorative buttons.

bespoke suit single breasted vs double breasted

Besom or Flap Pockets

Besom Pockets: pockets that are set into the jacket like a slit with a plain opening. Flap Pockets: pockets set into the jacket, but they are covered by flaps.

bespoke suit pockets besom vs. flap

Working or Show Buttons

Show buttons are exactly what they sound like: cuff buttons that are “just for show” and have no real functionality. Working Buttons are functional buttons that allow you to roll up your sleeves and are indicative of a bespoke suit.

bespoke suit buttons
Gentleman’s Gazette
Side Tabs on Pants

Ditch the belt loops and opt for side tabs with a few buttons on the sides of your pants that allow you to adjust your waist without ever needing to wear a belt. We like this look, but some may think of it as “retro.”

bespoke suit side tabs
Articles of Style
Interior Buttons

If you enjoy the nostalgia and old-school elegance of suspenders, consider getting interior buttons sewn into your trousers.

(Read: Everything You Need to Know about Suspenders (opens in new window))

Inner Pockets

There are a plethora of inner pockets you can trick out your suit with.

Ticket Pockets are literally for tickets, and come in handy for never misplacing them when you’re seeing a show. Left and Right Inside Pockets can be used for everything from money clips to iPads (however, if you’re gonna use them for an iPad, tell your tailor. He’ll customize the pocket size. Finally, you’ll want to add a secret inner pocket somewhere for all those classified CIA files you’re carrying around (or, you know, like a passport or something).

Once you know these terms, you can make decisions about besom or flap pockets, a medium break or no break, and tapered or straight pants, and so on. All these little details will help your tailor understand what exactly you’re looking for, down to the last button.

(For more terminology, read our tailoring guide (opens in new window).)

Now Find a Great Suit Tailor

Your First Bespoke Suit

Look for a tailor that, first and foremost, uses the term “bespoke” (not just “custom”). If a tailor actually does bespoke suits, you’ll know that he or she is an expert at crafting suits to your body type, as opposed to altering a pre-made pattern to accommodate your size (also known as made-to-measure, or MTM).

Other considerations to keep in mind when looking for the right tailor include consulting Google (Does he have good reviews? Bad reviews? No reviews?) and ultimately asking yourself if this person makes you feel comfortable.

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Further assess your potential tailor by first having alterations made on another garment of yours. Say, a pair of trousers or a blazer. Have an idea of what you’d like done, and if it’s done correctly, you can move on to discussing a suit.
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Other Noteworthy Tips

Bring Pictures

Visuals always help. If you’re a fan of the Savile Row style of Fred Astaire or appreciate the classy duds of George Clooney, find a picture of their suits you wouldn’t mind emulating. Bring it in as inspiration for your tailor. If possible, try to explain what about this particular suit you like.

Honesty is the Best Policy

Don’t lie to your tailor. He isn’t there to judge you; it’s his profession to make a suit that fits whatever your needs may be. What occasion is this suit for? Be upfront about where the suit will be worn, and the frequency with which it will be worn. It may seem minor to you, but every little detail can be helpful in painting the big picture for him. So, tell him the circumstances, explain the kinds of people you work with, the temperature in your office, anything. At the very least, you’ll be building rapport with him, and a nice relationship with your tailor is tantamount.

Along the same lines, don’t feel pressure to act differently. Just because you’re getting a suit does not mean you should affect a certain degree of formality that you otherwise wouldn’t. If you don’t enjoy suits, or if this is your first time ever needing one, don’t be afraid to let him know.

Finally, don’t try to lie to the tape measure, either. Sucking in won’t fool anyone. Accuracy is how to measure for a suit.

Get the Most Out of Your Fittings

When you finally do go in for your fittings, dress up! Wear the shoes you would normally wear with a suit, as well as a dress shirt. You’ll want to see exactly how your trousers break on your shoes, and how the sleeves and collar look under your jacket.

Speak Up

As you’re doing fittings, do not be afraid to speak up. If something isn’t fitting the way you imagined, tell your tailor immediately so that he can address the problem.

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Don’t be passive and assume that that’s the way it’s supposed to look or feel. Remember, you’re spending big bucks (we’re talking thousands, here) on this garment.
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If you don’t speak up, ask questions, or voice your concerns, the only person to blame if you’re not happy with the end result is yourself.

Be Patient

Getting your first suit made will take a decent amount of time and a nice handful of fittings (at least 2). Accept that you can’t rush this process, and look at the bright side: next time you go in for a bespoke suit, your tailor will have all your measurements and details on file so he can get to work right away.

And there you have it. Now that you’ve read up on all you need to know, you’re well-equipped to embark on your mission for the perfect bespoke suit. Understanding how to talk to your tailor and knowing a little about the nuances that go into the process are essential for having a good experience. Take this newfound knowledge, go out there, and be the dapper king that you are. Oh, and remember: behind every great man is a great tailor. Don’t forget to thank yours for helping you put your best foot forward.

Weddings, Brides and Grooms

Custom Wedding Tuxedos

Your Guide – Be Ready For all Events by Kelsi Trinidad

Another invite and another attempt to decipher the sometimes daunting dress code. With categories like White Tie, Black Tie, and Lounge, it can be overwhelming and confusing at times. Whether it’s charity gala or a formal wedding, dressing the part doesn’t have to be a cryptic task.

Black Tie The words “Black Tie” may conjure up memories of high school dances, but now that you are all grown up, this type of affair is a bit more involved than renting the generic polyester tux set from your local suit emporium (gross). When you attend the company awards nights, your sister’s formal wedding, or charity event that calls for Black Tie, it’s important abide by the rules to look your best. You don’t want your peers to get the impression that you’re as clueless as a pimply teenager. A classic black tuxedo is still the standard at these events. The typical tuxedo jacket has a single button and is single breasted with a satin peak lapel and no vent. A black bow tie and black patent leather oxfords are a must. Optional additions to the basic tuxedo include a simple (usually white) pocket square or an elegant opera scarf if you’re feeling a bit spry.

Black Tie is the most commonly used dress code for any polished event and knowing how to dress for it is a great weapon to have in your arsenal. A variation on the traditional Black Tie dress code is Warm Weather Black Tie which features a white jacket instead of black and is sometimes called upon for summer formal events. Formal or evening weddings, company awards dinners, and some private dinners are all occasions that may require you to don a tuxedo.

Black Tie Optional

The fact that the word “optional” is in the title is only begging for confusion. A host may choose this dress code if they want to be considerate of the fact that not all guests may have a tuxedo. At these events, it is acceptable to forgo the tuxedo (if you absolutely must) and opt for a polished black suit. However, if you have the means, we still encourage you to wear a tuxedo of some sort. Because of the precarious nature of the word “optional,” we suggest you to contact the host if you need clarification.

A Black Tie Optional event is still formal in nature but it has slightly more relaxed rules for attire. A tie is still necessary and so are your polished black shoes. Accessories can be used to express personal style. Instead of a bow tie, you can opt for a necktie with a handsome tie bar or a classy lapel flower. Tie bar placement is key, so if you are a tie bar rookie, check out our ultimate guide to tie bars. You’re most likely to run into this category at weddings, stylish events, formal dinners, and galas.

Black Tie Creative

This variation on the standard Black Tie category allows the party to get started with a little festivity. Black Tie Creative is an opportunity to showcase your personal style in terms of color, accessories, and collar and lapel style. You may opt for the uncommon shawl lapel or a slim cut tuxedo in a dark saturated color like midnight blue or maroon. A colored jacket, colored wingtips shoes, or a brightly colored bow tie are all fair game in this category. Even going with a black shirt instead of white can add subtle creative flair. Although this dress code offers flexibility, it is important to keep in mind that if the event is“Black Tie” at all, no matter how festive or creative it is, it is a formal event and your sartorial modifications should still honor a the formal atmosphere of the event. Keep in mind that wearing a standard tux or an ensemble with “black tie optional” qualities is also perfectly acceptable.

A variant of the Black Tie Creative dress code is Festive Black Tie. How you should dress to this occasion depends on the given situation or theme of the party. The most common example of a Festive Black Tie event is a company Christmas party, but there are infinite ways to twist it and that depends on the host. Fun themes like “Black Tie and Boots” call for wearing a bolo tie with a tuxedo or sporting a Western-themed tie or cufflinks.

Lounge A Lounge dress code event maintains formality while allowing for the integration of more color and options into your look. Tuxedos are totally out of the picture for this dress code. A suit in a dark, neutral color such as classic black, navy, or gray is recommended. Take a little liberty with your lapel and collar style as Lounge attire is less strict than the other formal dress codes. Polished shoes are not necessary and both black and brown shoes work. If you are feeling adventurous, mix in a pastel colored shirt or a subtly patterned tie to give your suit character. Pairing a skinny tie with a nice tie bar can give your Lounge outfit a modern edge. This category can be worn to daytime formal parties or business dinners.

Gone is the dread of another invitation with a dress code! Now that you are seasoned in formal dress codes, take a little liberty when you can and remember when you shouldn’t. The age-old rule of thumb has not changed, it’s better to be overdressed than under-dressed.

Custom Bespoke Wedding Tuxedos

Your Guide – Be Ready For all tuxedo Events
Sew Bespoke Clothing I Custom Bespoke Suits and Shirts

Another invite and another attempt to decipher the sometimes daunting dress code. With categories like White Tie, Black Tie, and Lounge, it can be overwhelming and confusing at times. Whether it’s charity gala or a formal wedding, dressing the part doesn’t have to be a cryptic task.

Black Tie The words “Black Tie” may conjure up memories of high school dances, but now that you are all grown up, this type of affair is a bit more involved than renting the generic polyester tux set from your local suit emporium (gross). When you attend the company awards nights, your sister’s formal wedding, or charity event that calls for Black Tie, it’s important abide by the rules to look your best. You don’t want your peers to get the impression that you’re as clueless as a pimply teenager. A classic black tuxedo is still the standard at these events. The typical tuxedo jacket has a single button and is single breasted with a satin peak lapel and no vent. A black bow tie and black patent leather oxfords are a must. Optional additions to the basic tuxedo include a simple (usually white) pocket square or an elegant opera scarf if you’re feeling a bit spry.

Black Tie is the most commonly used dress code for any polished event and knowing how to dress for it is a great weapon to have in your arsenal. A variation on the traditional Black Tie dress code is Warm Weather Black Tie which features a white jacket instead of black and is sometimes called upon for summer formal events. Formal or evening weddings, company awards dinners, and some private dinners are all occasions that may require you to don a tuxedo.

Black Tie Optional

The fact that the word “optional” is in the title is only begging for confusion. A host may choose this dress code if they want to be considerate of the fact that not all guests may have a tuxedo. At these events, it is acceptable to forgo the tuxedo (if you absolutely must) and opt for a polished black suit. However, if you have the means, we still encourage you to wear a tuxedo of some sort. Because of the precarious nature of the word “optional,” we suggest you to contact the host if you need clarification.

A Black Tie Optional event is still formal in nature but it has slightly more relaxed rules for attire. A tie is still necessary and so are your polished black shoes. Accessories can be used to express personal style. Instead of a bow tie, you can opt for a necktie with a handsome tie bar or a classy lapel flower. Tie bar placement is key, so if you are a tie bar rookie, check out our ultimate guide to tie bars. You’re most likely to run into this category at weddings, stylish events, formal dinners, and galas.

Black Tie Creative

This variation on the standard Black Tie category allows the party to get started with a little festivity. Black Tie Creative is an opportunity to showcase your personal style in terms of color, accessories, and collar and lapel style. You may opt for the uncommon shawl lapel or a slim cut tuxedo in a dark saturated color like midnight blue or maroon. A colored jacket, colored wingtips shoes, or a brightly colored bow tie are all fair game in this category. Even going with a black shirt instead of white can add subtle creative flair. Although this dress code offers flexibility, it is important to keep in mind that if the event is “Black Tie” at all, no matter how festive or creative it is, it is a formal event and your sartorial modifications should still honor a the formal atmosphere of the event. Keep in mind that wearing a standard tux or an ensemble with “black tie optional” qualities is also perfectly acceptable.

A variant of the Black Tie Creative dress code is Festive Black Tie. How you should dress to this occasion depends on the given situation or theme of the party. The most common example of a Festive Black Tie event is a company Christmas party, but there are infinite ways to twist it and that depends on the host. Fun themes like “Black Tie and Boots” call for wearing a bolo tie with a tuxedo or sporting a Western-themed tie or cufflinks.

Lounge A Lounge dress code event maintains formality while allowing for the integration of more color and options into your look. Tuxedos are totally out of the picture for this dress code. A suit in a dark, neutral color such as classic black, navy, or gray is recommended. Take a little liberty with your lapel and collar style as Lounge attire is less strict than the other formal dress codes. Polished shoes are not necessary and both black and brown shoes work. If you are feeling adventurous, mix in a pastel colored shirt or a subtly patterned tie to give your suit character. Pairing a skinny tie with a nice tie bar can give your Lounge outfit a modern edge. This category can be worn to daytime formal parties or business dinners.

Gone is the dread of another invitation with a dress code! Now that you are seasoned in formal dress codes, take a little liberty when you can and remember when you shouldn’t. The age-old rule of thumb has not changed, it’s better to be overdressed than under-dressed.

NYC Best Custom Suits & Shirts

CUSTOM SUITS $995 – BESPOKE SHIRTS $175 Place your trust in one on New Yorks longest standing bespoke tailor shops. Experienced and fashion savvy we have the know how to make you look and feel your best. Our Bespoke suits and shirts are without peer. We use the finest fabrics and our family run workshops provide the highest level of workmanship. Dont be fooled by bottom of the barrel pricing here on google. Stick with the tried and true. Sew Bespoke Clothing has been a family business since 1948. Started in Brooklyn NY and now anchored in Midtown. Just blocks from Grand Central and Rockefeller Center. High above the city you can relax and choose your suit, tuxedo and shirt fabrics. You will be measured by an expert who will guide you through the fit and cut that will suit you the best. You will be impressed by our fabric selections by Guabello, Tessilstrona, Vitale Barberis, LoroPiana, Dormeuil, Drago, Thomas Mason, Harrisons and many more.

Custom Bespoke Tuxedos

Weddings, weddings and more weddings. Custom Tuxedos and wedding go hand in hand. Nothing better than to see a groom in a well made Bespoke tuxedo. We have been at the epicenter of hundreds of nuptials in our storied history. CUSTOM TUXEDOS $1095

There’s a million ways to create a unique look for a wedding with the right well designed tux! 1. Black is not the only color- Navy blue, White, Plaid, 2.Single breasted as well as double breasted are trendy. 3.Peak lapel, Shawl or Notch? 4.Satin trimming or not? 5.Tuxedo shirt or flat front shirt? 6.Wool, Linen, Seersucker cloth? Get the message? There are many many options to consider. We have made each and every wedding suit or tuxedo theme that can be imagined. Does this make us experts on wedding attire? Yes, absolutely! CALL US FOR A CONSULT 212-686-1630