Custom Tuxedo

Weddings, Brides and Grooms

Custom Wedding Tuxedos

Your Guide – Be Ready For all Events by Kelsi Trinidad

Another invite and another attempt to decipher the sometimes daunting dress code. With categories like White Tie, Black Tie, and Lounge, it can be overwhelming and confusing at times. Whether it’s charity gala or a formal wedding, dressing the part doesn’t have to be a cryptic task.

Black Tie The words “Black Tie” may conjure up memories of high school dances, but now that you are all grown up, this type of affair is a bit more involved than renting the generic polyester tux set from your local suit emporium (gross). When you attend the company awards nights, your sister’s formal wedding, or charity event that calls for Black Tie, it’s important abide by the rules to look your best. You don’t want your peers to get the impression that you’re as clueless as a pimply teenager. A classic black tuxedo is still the standard at these events. The typical tuxedo jacket has a single button and is single breasted with a satin peak lapel and no vent. A black bow tie and black patent leather oxfords are a must. Optional additions to the basic tuxedo include a simple (usually white) pocket square or an elegant opera scarf if you’re feeling a bit spry.

Black Tie is the most commonly used dress code for any polished event and knowing how to dress for it is a great weapon to have in your arsenal. A variation on the traditional Black Tie dress code is Warm Weather Black Tie which features a white jacket instead of black and is sometimes called upon for summer formal events. Formal or evening weddings, company awards dinners, and some private dinners are all occasions that may require you to don a tuxedo.

Black Tie Optional

The fact that the word “optional” is in the title is only begging for confusion. A host may choose this dress code if they want to be considerate of the fact that not all guests may have a tuxedo. At these events, it is acceptable to forgo the tuxedo (if you absolutely must) and opt for a polished black suit. However, if you have the means, we still encourage you to wear a tuxedo of some sort. Because of the precarious nature of the word “optional,” we suggest you to contact the host if you need clarification.

A Black Tie Optional event is still formal in nature but it has slightly more relaxed rules for attire. A tie is still necessary and so are your polished black shoes. Accessories can be used to express personal style. Instead of a bow tie, you can opt for a necktie with a handsome tie bar or a classy lapel flower. Tie bar placement is key, so if you are a tie bar rookie, check out our ultimate guide to tie bars. You’re most likely to run into this category at weddings, stylish events, formal dinners, and galas.

Black Tie Creative

This variation on the standard Black Tie category allows the party to get started with a little festivity. Black Tie Creative is an opportunity to showcase your personal style in terms of color, accessories, and collar and lapel style. You may opt for the uncommon shawl lapel or a slim cut tuxedo in a dark saturated color like midnight blue or maroon. A colored jacket, colored wingtips shoes, or a brightly colored bow tie are all fair game in this category. Even going with a black shirt instead of white can add subtle creative flair. Although this dress code offers flexibility, it is important to keep in mind that if the event is“Black Tie” at all, no matter how festive or creative it is, it is a formal event and your sartorial modifications should still honor a the formal atmosphere of the event. Keep in mind that wearing a standard tux or an ensemble with “black tie optional” qualities is also perfectly acceptable.

A variant of the Black Tie Creative dress code is Festive Black Tie. How you should dress to this occasion depends on the given situation or theme of the party. The most common example of a Festive Black Tie event is a company Christmas party, but there are infinite ways to twist it and that depends on the host. Fun themes like “Black Tie and Boots” call for wearing a bolo tie with a tuxedo or sporting a Western-themed tie or cufflinks.

Lounge A Lounge dress code event maintains formality while allowing for the integration of more color and options into your look. Tuxedos are totally out of the picture for this dress code. A suit in a dark, neutral color such as classic black, navy, or gray is recommended. Take a little liberty with your lapel and collar style as Lounge attire is less strict than the other formal dress codes. Polished shoes are not necessary and both black and brown shoes work. If you are feeling adventurous, mix in a pastel colored shirt or a subtly patterned tie to give your suit character. Pairing a skinny tie with a nice tie bar can give your Lounge outfit a modern edge. This category can be worn to daytime formal parties or business dinners.

Gone is the dread of another invitation with a dress code! Now that you are seasoned in formal dress codes, take a little liberty when you can and remember when you shouldn’t. The age-old rule of thumb has not changed, it’s better to be overdressed than under-dressed.

Custom Bespoke Wedding Tuxedos

Your Guide – Be Ready For all tuxedo Events
Sew Bespoke Clothing I Custom Bespoke Suits and Shirts

Another invite and another attempt to decipher the sometimes daunting dress code. With categories like White Tie, Black Tie, and Lounge, it can be overwhelming and confusing at times. Whether it’s charity gala or a formal wedding, dressing the part doesn’t have to be a cryptic task.

Black Tie The words “Black Tie” may conjure up memories of high school dances, but now that you are all grown up, this type of affair is a bit more involved than renting the generic polyester tux set from your local suit emporium (gross). When you attend the company awards nights, your sister’s formal wedding, or charity event that calls for Black Tie, it’s important abide by the rules to look your best. You don’t want your peers to get the impression that you’re as clueless as a pimply teenager. A classic black tuxedo is still the standard at these events. The typical tuxedo jacket has a single button and is single breasted with a satin peak lapel and no vent. A black bow tie and black patent leather oxfords are a must. Optional additions to the basic tuxedo include a simple (usually white) pocket square or an elegant opera scarf if you’re feeling a bit spry.

Black Tie is the most commonly used dress code for any polished event and knowing how to dress for it is a great weapon to have in your arsenal. A variation on the traditional Black Tie dress code is Warm Weather Black Tie which features a white jacket instead of black and is sometimes called upon for summer formal events. Formal or evening weddings, company awards dinners, and some private dinners are all occasions that may require you to don a tuxedo.

Black Tie Optional

The fact that the word “optional” is in the title is only begging for confusion. A host may choose this dress code if they want to be considerate of the fact that not all guests may have a tuxedo. At these events, it is acceptable to forgo the tuxedo (if you absolutely must) and opt for a polished black suit. However, if you have the means, we still encourage you to wear a tuxedo of some sort. Because of the precarious nature of the word “optional,” we suggest you to contact the host if you need clarification.

A Black Tie Optional event is still formal in nature but it has slightly more relaxed rules for attire. A tie is still necessary and so are your polished black shoes. Accessories can be used to express personal style. Instead of a bow tie, you can opt for a necktie with a handsome tie bar or a classy lapel flower. Tie bar placement is key, so if you are a tie bar rookie, check out our ultimate guide to tie bars. You’re most likely to run into this category at weddings, stylish events, formal dinners, and galas.

Black Tie Creative

This variation on the standard Black Tie category allows the party to get started with a little festivity. Black Tie Creative is an opportunity to showcase your personal style in terms of color, accessories, and collar and lapel style. You may opt for the uncommon shawl lapel or a slim cut tuxedo in a dark saturated color like midnight blue or maroon. A colored jacket, colored wingtips shoes, or a brightly colored bow tie are all fair game in this category. Even going with a black shirt instead of white can add subtle creative flair. Although this dress code offers flexibility, it is important to keep in mind that if the event is “Black Tie” at all, no matter how festive or creative it is, it is a formal event and your sartorial modifications should still honor a the formal atmosphere of the event. Keep in mind that wearing a standard tux or an ensemble with “black tie optional” qualities is also perfectly acceptable.

A variant of the Black Tie Creative dress code is Festive Black Tie. How you should dress to this occasion depends on the given situation or theme of the party. The most common example of a Festive Black Tie event is a company Christmas party, but there are infinite ways to twist it and that depends on the host. Fun themes like “Black Tie and Boots” call for wearing a bolo tie with a tuxedo or sporting a Western-themed tie or cufflinks.

Lounge A Lounge dress code event maintains formality while allowing for the integration of more color and options into your look. Tuxedos are totally out of the picture for this dress code. A suit in a dark, neutral color such as classic black, navy, or gray is recommended. Take a little liberty with your lapel and collar style as Lounge attire is less strict than the other formal dress codes. Polished shoes are not necessary and both black and brown shoes work. If you are feeling adventurous, mix in a pastel colored shirt or a subtly patterned tie to give your suit character. Pairing a skinny tie with a nice tie bar can give your Lounge outfit a modern edge. This category can be worn to daytime formal parties or business dinners.

Gone is the dread of another invitation with a dress code! Now that you are seasoned in formal dress codes, take a little liberty when you can and remember when you shouldn’t. The age-old rule of thumb has not changed, it’s better to be overdressed than under-dressed.

Custom Bespoke Tuxedos

Weddings, weddings and more weddings. Custom Tuxedos and wedding go hand in hand. Nothing better than to see a groom in a well made Bespoke tuxedo. We have been at the epicenter of hundreds of nuptials in our storied history. CUSTOM TUXEDOS $1095

There’s a million ways to create a unique look for a wedding with the right well designed tux! 1. Black is not the only color- Navy blue, White, Plaid, 2.Single breasted as well as double breasted are trendy. 3.Peak lapel, Shawl or Notch? 4.Satin trimming or not? 5.Tuxedo shirt or flat front shirt? 6.Wool, Linen, Seersucker cloth? Get the message? There are many many options to consider. We have made each and every wedding suit or tuxedo theme that can be imagined. Does this make us experts on wedding attire? Yes, absolutely! CALL US FOR A CONSULT 212-686-1630

Custom Wedding Tuxedos NYC

NYC and weddings are synonymous, Custom and Tuxedos are like frick and frack. You have found the proper place that puts it all together. SEW Bespoke clothing a family business that traces its roots and first location to Brooklyn in 1948. Harry Wasserberger the family patriarch a tailor and cutter by trade worked long hours and treated everyone fairly. His grandson now presides over the same business with the same work ethic and a sharp sense of style.

Our custom Bespoke Tuxedos begin at $1095, even at that low price we offer Italian fabric and full canvas construction, no fusing or glue here. as one of the longer tenured tailors in Manhattan you will be expertly measured and consulted and coached on every aspect. Fabric weight, texture, color, fit, cut and any personal peeves.

You will love how you feel and look, its guaranteed!

Custom Wedding Tuxedos NYC

A Guide To Tuxedos: How To Wear A Tuxedo With Style Including Tips For Tux Shoes, Shirts, Bow Ties, Accessories & More
Tuxedo jacket and shirt front

This page covers everything you’ve ever wanted to know about wearing a tuxedo including:

What Is A Tuxedo?
History Of The Tuxedo
How To Wear A Tuxedo
Jacket & Trousers
Tuxedo Shirts
Tuxedo Shoes
Bow Ties
Cummerbunds
Tux Accessories
When To Wear A Tuxedo
You can click on one of the links above to skip ahead to a specific section that you are interested in or can simply continue below to read the full article from start to finish.

Everything You Need To Know About Tuxedos
When a man dons a perfectly-fitted, detail-correct tuxedo, he is transformed into the most handsome, dapper version of himself. As an ensemble reserved for special occasions, a man may not have many opportunities to wear a tux, but when an opportunity does arise, he should take advantage to the fullest extent.

But, what is a tuxedo? When should you wear one? How does it differ from a suit? Furthermore, what’s a smoking jacket, and how is it different than a tuxedo?

If you’ve ever asked these questions, you’re in the right place!

What Is A Tuxedo?
Daniel-Craig-Shawl-Collar-Tux-
Daniel Craig in a single-breasted shawl collar tuxedo.

A tuxedo is evening semi-formalwear for men. Referred to as a “dinner jacket” in the British Isles, le smoking in France, and un esmóquin in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries, it is a simple, high-contrast ensemble consisting of the following:

Matching black jacket, trousers, and cummerbund or waistcoat
White French/double cuff shirt
Black patent leather shoes
Black bow tie
There are variations on the above, but we will address that later.

History Of The Tuxedo

As with most things we wear in the Western world, the story starts in England.

Before the mid-nineteenth century, men of means and status wore traditional tailcoats for dinner in their homes. Beautiful as this looked, it was a chore to get into and out of a tailcoat and trousers. But, rules being rules, men abided by this code regardless of the nuisance it entailed.

In the mid-1800’s, Savile Row was beginning to flourish as a bespoke tailoring destination. One the tailors on the row was a gentleman named Henry Poole, whose shop is still at 15 Savile Row. Henry was fortunate in that he had friends in high places: specifically, King Edward VII. His Majesty commissioned Poole to create a short jacket to replace the tailcoat for dinners, as these would be more comfortable.

They were, and the decline of the tailcoat’s popularity began as those in the King’s social circle ordered their own short jackets and the style became commonplace for dinners in the home.

Where Does The Word “Tuxedo” Come From?

As it happens, the word “tuxedo” is an American term. It comes from Tuxedo Park, a small town in New York’s Hudson Valley that was an enclave for Manhattan’s social elite. The word came into common usage around 1888, thanks to a Tuxedo Park resident named James Brown Potter.

He and his wife Cora met the then-Prince of Wales at a court ball, and the Prince, somewhat taken with Cora, invited them to Sandringham, his hunting estate in Norfolk. Potter inquired about what to wear, and the Prince instructed him to visit his tailor in London to have a short jacket made up. He did just that, and returned home to Tuxedo Park with his garment in tow.

Upon his return, other Tuxedo Park residents were quite taken with this ensemble and copied it, as they felt it was more appropriate for informal dinners than tails.

There’s a story that a few Tuxedo locals went to dinner sporting their tuxes at Delmonico’s, which was the only public local establishment in which men didn’t have to “dress” for dinner. The other patrons had never seen anything like this before, and when they inquired about it, they were told that that was just how men in Tuxedo dressed for dinner. The name stuck.

Humorously, Tuxedo Park’s founder, tobacco tycoon Pierre Lorillard IV, attended Tuxedo Park’s first Autumn Ball wearing this “tail-less dress coat.” He was asked to leave.

Materials

Traditionally, tuxedos are made from barathea wool. They’re typically black, but midnight blue tuxedos came into fashion when the Duke Of Windsor had one made up on the premise that very dark blue looks blacker than black under artificial light. As it happens, he was correct; black has a greenish cast to it under synthetic lamps.

Two key materials in tuxedos are silk or grosgrain. Either of these materials can be used for facings for lapels, buttons, pocket seams, and trouser outseams. This is a key differentiator between a suit and a tuxedo.

How To Wear A Tuxedo
As an evening ensemble, a tuxedo should only be worn at night. Traditionally, this means any semi-formal event that begins at or after 6 in the evening.

How Should A Tuxedo Fit?
Your tuxedo should fit just like your suit does. We have an entire guide to suit fit if you’re unsure of the particulars there.

The one exception to this is in the case of certain smoking jackets, which are intentionally cut more loosely than standard dinner jackets.

Jacket & Trousers

The jacket and pants are the main components of any tuxedo.

Man wearing proper tuxedoA tuxedo jacket is typically black or a dark navy blue, however other fabric colors exist for less formal occasions. A peak lapel is the most traditional and formal lapel style for a tuxedo jacket, but it is possible to wear a shawl collared tux to a black tie event, while a notch lapel is more appropriate for semi-formal occasions.

Shirts

The tuxedo shirt is traditionally white and takes either a wing collar or a regular turndown collar with a pleated front.

Tuxedo shirt graphicYou can read more about the different characteristics of the shirt in our guide to tuxedo shirts.

Shoes

Proper tuxedo shoes

Proper tuxedo shoes are black patent leather oxfords, Venetian loafers, or opera pumps. Oxfords in calfskin with a high shine are also acceptable, as are velvet slippers (though these are only acceptable in less sartorially fusty instances).

See our complete guide to tuxedo shoes for more information.

Bow Tie

Tuxedo bow tie graphic

The bow tie should be black and match the facings’ material on your lapels (either silk or grosgrain). As with any bow tie worth wearing, it must be self-tied.

Don’t know how to tie a bow tie? No problem. Visit our step-by-step guide on how to tie a bow tie.

Semi-Formal Waist Coverings

Your choice is a cummerbund or a waistcoat. Our guide to cummerbunds will have everything you need to know about them.

Different Color Cummerbunds

If you opt for a waistcoat (“vest” for our American readers), it should traditionally match your jacket and trousers.

Different color vests for tuxedos

Black Tie Accessories

Studs that take the place of shirt buttons and cufflinks are all the jewelry you’ll need!

Custom Bespoke Tuxedos NYC

Most flattering tuxedo styles for men
TuxedoIf a man is part of a wedding party, he has little to say about the tuxedo he’ll be wearing. The bride- and groom-to-be usually make that decision.

However, a man who needs to rent or buy a tuxedo for other weddings or formal events has lots of choices.

There are definitely trends in men’s formal wear. But to look and feel his best and most confident–whether he pays full price or happens upon a great sale–a man should select a style that flatters his body type.

Here are some good, easy formal wear-buying guidelines for men of all shapes and sizes:

CHOOSE STYLES ACCORDING TO BODY TYPE
Short and thin:
Avoid a jacket that will overwhelm you, such as double-breasted styles. Try a one-, two-. or three-button single-breasted jacket with a low button stance. Opt for thin lapels; or if you want to add more width to your upper body, go with a wide lapel or notched collar. Accessories with large, obvious patterns can also be overwhelming. A solid cummerbund or a subtly patterned vest and a matching bow tie are the way to go.

Short and stocky:
A classic black one- or two-button tuxedo with a shawl lapel is an excellent choice for you. Black is slimming, and the longer lapels will add length.

If you have a thick waist, choose a vest instead of a cummerbund. The horizontal lines of a cummerbund will add width, while the vertical lines of a vest will add length and draw attention upwards, toward your face. Pair the vest with a four-in-hand tie to really emphasize the look and add length. For shirts, avoid wing-tip collars, which will make your face look heavier.

Tall and thin:
You can wear almost any style. You will look equally good in a classic black tux, a longer 5-button jacket, or a double-breasted style. The same goes for accessories—you have many options.

Tall and stocky:
Avoid double-breasted jackets and wide lapels since they will add bulk. Instead, opt for a thinner shawl lapel and a traditional single-breasted tuxedo jacket.

When it comes to accessories, if you have a wide face or a thick neck, avoid thin ties and wing collar shirts, which will add weight to your face. Similarly, opt for a non-pleated or wide-pleated shirt. Multiple thin pleats will add bulk. If you have a thick waist, try a vest instead of a cummerbund and bow tie. The horizontal lines of a cummerbund will add width, while the vertical lines of a vest will add length and draw attention upwards, toward your face.

MORE MEN’S FORMAL DRESS-UP FASHION TIPS:
Jacket fit: Shoulder seams should fall at the natural shoulder. Fit should be completely smooth in the back, without any pulling or gaping across the shoulders or extra fabric hanging in the area between the shoulders.

Jacket length: The jacket should reach your fingertips when your hands are completely relaxed and cupped.

Sleeve length: The sleeve of a man’s tuxedo or other jacket should fall to where the wrist breaks.

Shirt length: At least a half inch, and preferably 1″ beyond the sleeve of the tuxedo jacket

Pants break: The classic break is one in which pants barely touch the front of the shoe end are angled back to touch the top of the shoe sole in the back.

Weddings, Brides and Grooms

NYC Wedding Guide Tuxedo or Suit

Ok the date is set and all the planning is a go. What should the groom wear? Custom bespoke tuxedo? Or Custom suit? There is no one answer or one size fits all response to that question. It is your call to make UNLESS there is a set dress code.

There is no more elegant garment to wear than a tailored tuxedo- black or navy blue will do the trick. Yes there are hipper and cooler options like a bright royal blue or a red wine. Both of those are a bit more fashion forward and usually lean to a younger crowd and body type. The collar or lapel dictates quite the look of your tuxedo, Notch collar or lapel is the enduring classic basic, Peak offers a bit of savoir fare, Shawl or round collars are very cool and very James Bond(ish). The fit or cut you desire is the foundation of your tuxedo….Double breasted is both old school for men over 50 and new school for gents below 30! Single breasted one or two button is most popular and provides a way to personalize your look even further. BUT if a suit is more suited to your event?? the world is wide open. Depending on dress code, weather and preference you can wear any color from light blue, black, white, grey and more. Book and appointment to review all your options in person.

Custom Event Tuxedos in NYC


The best and worst thing about a black-tie dress code at an event like the Golden Globes (or for us normal folks, a fancy wedding/charity event/corporate dinner) is how clearly defined the style boundaries are. You are either doing it right, or you are taking a huge risk. Sometimes that risk pays off, as it did tonight with Donald Glover in his brown velvet Gucci tuxedo, but often it does not. Tonight at the Golden Globes though, a few stylish guys (Glover included) stick a pinky toe over that line in a clever way by upsizing their bow-ties to almost Dr. Suess-level largeness (think: 2.5″ or 3″ instead of 1.5″). They didn’t break the rules by doing this, but it stole a bit of attention away anyway

NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images via Getty Images
The bigger, butterfly bow-tie look is charming, sweet, and a little bit ’70s. Instead of Tucker Carlson vibes, it gives you Alessandro Michele vibes. Instead of making you look like the most serious dude in the room, it makes you look like the guy who is for sure going to rage at the after-party. In short, we’re into it. If you’re looking for a subtle way to make a traditional tuxedo look less…traditional, you’d be wise to ditch your Pee-Wee Herman bow-tie and double down on something just as substantial.

Custom Tuxedos NYC

Bespoke Tuxedos and Wedding suits

Getting Married? – Groom or Best Man? – Guest of a guest? We have over 100 years and 3 generations of experience.

We design, coordinate and consult for full wedding parties. No tailor in New York City, NY has more experience and better taste.

Black Tuxedo is your taste – Midnight Blue Tuxedo is to your liking – White Dinner Jacket?

Like it super slim and tight in the arms – Super trim pants?

Tight is not your style – Want more room, more traditional?

We are prepared and experienced in all Formal Wear. Why can we say that? because in the past decades we have provided every style of wedding attire you can imagine.

It is simply better if you have done it many times before, no guess work.

Want to outfit your entire bridal party? Want to buy your Best Man a coordinated Custom Suit or Custom Tuxedo? Our experience dictates that we are the right custom tailor for you.

Your bridal party will look like none other before, guaranteed!

HONEYMOON

We have it covered. Custom Made Linen Suits, Fun blazers, Funky Patterned Shirts, Cotton and Poplin custom Pants?

New York’s Premier Tailor. Bespoke Suits Handmade In New York. Best Fit In NYC. Custom Suits By NY’s Most Experienced Fitter. Great Pricing. Packages.

555 5th Avenue NY, NY 10017

1-212-686-1630

We are by appointment Monday-Saturday please call or message here.

Custom Bespoke Tuxedos NYC

Custom Tuxedos $1095 Want to manage a new project or move into a leadership role at work? Consider slipping into a suit — or at least more formal clothing. A recent study cited in The Atlantic finds that people who don formal business attire think differently than those dressed in jeans and flip-flops.

The cast of “How I Met Your Mother” perform the musical number Girls Vs. Suits, on the 100th episode.

“We usually think about how what we wear affects how other people perceive us, so the first interesting thing is that our clothing affects us as well,” writes Abraham Rutchick, an author of the paper and an associate professor of psychology at California State University, Northridge, via email.

Rutchick and his colleagues conducted six experiments where they looked at how clothing impacted how the wearers felt and thought. In four experiments, subjects reported how the clothing they wore made them feel; they then participated in a cognitive task. People who felt they were dressed more formally demonstrated an increased ability to think abstractly.

“Wearing formal clothing makes us feel more powerful, which brings with it a sense of more social distance from other people. Power and abstract processing have been repeated linked to one another in literature,” says Rutchick.

There’s little evidence in the literature about why power and abstract thinking are linked. Rutchick speculates that people who run businesses, for example, might need to think abstractly while employees who need to carry out the day-to-day work need to focus on the details.

“Keep in mind it’s not necessarily ‘better’ to think more abstractly. It means more broadly, creatively … but also in a less detail-oriented way,” he says.

In the other two studies, Rutchick asked students to bring two sets of clothes to a lab — a set to wear to class and a set to wear to a job interview. Interview attire varied greatly with women most often wearing dress pants and blouses and men wearing ties or full suits. The researchers randomly directed students to wear one set of clothing and participate in cognitive tests. Again the more formal the clothing, the more a person thought abstractly.

“The clothing we wear really can influence what we think and even the way we think,” says Josh Davis, author of the forthcoming book “Two Awesome Hours: Science-Based Strategies to Harness Your Best Time and Get Your Most Important Work Done” and director of research and lead professor at NeuroLeadership Institute, who was not involved in the study. “It does lend some support to dress for success”

While Davis believes that the paper shows that an outfit can change a person’s thought process, he agrees with the authors that dress isn’t a magic bullet.

“It can do that. It doesn’t mean that it will do that,” he says.

Davis says there aren’t many studies on how clothing primes thought, but it is an emerging area of research. Interestingly, a 2012 study found that when people wear a white coat associated with doctor’s they pay more attention to detail.

Rutchcick also looked at whether formal wear became less powerful if people wore it regularly. No matter the frequency, wearing a suit fostered a particular way of thinking.

“Putting on a suit (even if habitual or routine) brings with it the adoption of a certain mindset,” he says.